wisdom (n)

From Old English, originally: wise + doom.
To be wise about one’s doom is to have wisdom.

Wise –>

witen (Old English) “to know”
witan (Gothic) “to know”
videre (Latin) “to see”
vidati (Sanskrit) “to know”

To know one’s doom.

Doom –>

dom (Old English) “judgment, law”
doms (Gothic)
dhaman (Sanskrit)
themis (Greek) –> related “to think, to form an opinion, to believe.”

To know one’s end, or one’s judgment is to have wisdom. Taken from an eschatological perspective, wisdom is knowing that Christ’s judgment is coming, memento mori, ephermality of the physical world, etc. Taken from a modern environmental perspective, wisdom is something like foresight, understanding global warming, knowing our collective fate and thus being prepared for it, whether body or soul.

Prophets have wisdom.

Inspector Finch has it, briefly.

Future Monuments are about projecting wise-doom.

 

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chronotype (n).

“refers to the behavioral manifestation of underlying circadian rhythms of myriad physical processes. A person’s chronotype is the propensity for the individual to sleep at a particular time during a 24-hour period.”

In other words: are you an early bird, or a night owl?

Rather than focus on such a simple binary based on psychology/circadian rhythms, chronotype might be more useful when extended to the wider variety of potential temporalities–your chronotype refers to what type of time you personally most often experience.

chronosynclastic infundibulum (n)

n. A point in space where, upon a person entering it, that person’s existence in space-time ceases to be linear, becoming discrete. This means that a person that has entered a chronosynclastic infundibulum exists at multiple points and lines in space-time. For example, such a person could exist at all points in time in one place and also appear at another point for five minutes.

From Kurt Vonnegut’s “The Sirens of Titan.”

Winston Niles Rumfoord’s entrance into the chronosynclastic infundibulum allowed him to exist simultaneously on Titan and also occasionally on Earth.
[This text copy-pasted from Urban Dictionary]

retrofuture (n)

retrofutures (pl); retrofuturistic (adj)

(Latin: retro “backward” — futurus.. [essere – to be; futurus – about to be])

If “futurism is sometimes called a ‘science’ bent on anticipating what will come, retrofuturism is the remembering of that anticipation.” — Guffey & Lemay

Cf: steampunk, world’s fairs, the world before you knew Santa wasn’t real.

mellalgia (n)

mellalgic (adj)

The opposite of nostalgia, mellalgia is a sentimental longing or wistful affection for the future, typically for a period or place with happy personal associations.

Ety. Greek: μέλλο: “future” + ἄλγος: “pain.”

Inspired by the late Svetlana Boym’s wonderful book, The Future of Nostalgia. Mellalgia is the topic of Proust’s unfinished book, Remembrance of Things to Come. C. J. Cherryh experiments with the idea of mellalgia in her short story, “The Threads of Time,” in which she describes her time traveling protagonist experiencing such a feeling:

He lived scattered lives in ages to come, and remembered the future with increasing melancholy.

I totally made this word up in the name of academese.